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Inguinal Hernia

Approximately 600,000 hernia repair operations are performed annually in the United States. Many are performed by the conventional “open” method. Some are performed laparoscopically. Laparoscopic hernia repair is a relatively new surgical technique to fix tears in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, a patch (mesh), and special cameras to view inside the body. It frequently offers a more rapid recovery for the patient, less postoperative pain, and a quicker return to work and normal activities.


The most common location for hernias is the groin (or inguinal) area. There are several reasons for this tendency. First, there is a natural anatomical weakness in the groin region which results from incomplete muscle coverage. Second, the upright position of human posture results in a greater force pushing toward the bottom of the abdomen, thereby increasing the stress on these weaker tissues. The combination of these factors over time breaks down the support tissues, enlarging any preexisting hole, or leads to a tear resulting in a new hole. Performing this surgery laprascopically saves the patient trauma and shortens the recovery time significantly versus open repair.